June 19, 2010

Father Figure...

When you look in the mirror, you see your Father's _________? Otherwise, what has your Dad passed down to you?



17 comments:

  1. This is a complex question for me. I don't want to see my father, frankly. And, physically, we don't look much alike. We're both tall. We both have blue eyes. Our laughs are almost identical. While my father is a very nice man (he would help most any stranger, he often lets tenants work to pay rent they can't otherwise afford, and so on), he seems nicer to strangers. He is also very emotional (I think I sometimes try very hard not to show too much emotion for that reason). And those emotions come are often inappropriate. I'll look forward to reading some happy responses to this question!

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  2. when I speak--whether with an intimate gathering of friends or before a throng because of my chosen career path--I see glimpses of my father's father. My lean build, the construct of my hands, feet, and head (actually more!) mirror that of my paternal grandfather. I recently shared Reflections at my Uncle Fred's funeral and various people were reminded of my grandfather (who was a preacher)..."You look so much like your Grand Daddy!".

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  3. My father died 40 years ago, when I was in 4th grade. Most of the things I connect to him are very superficial: The texture of my hair, the shape of my eyes. The memories I have of him are both warm -- and not. ("Patience" -- especially when it came to little kids -- wasn't his middle name.) I realize that my memories were formed in the mind of a child, but are being examined by the mind of a woman, and the truth lies somewhere in between. I am okay with that ... Sometimes.

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  4. Sadly for me, I do not know what legacy my father may have left me. My mother died when I was one years old and my father died the following year. The father figures I have had in my life were my older uncles and cousins. But we won't go into that. Since I have gotten older I have learned to see the positive in my male family members and but be conscious of the negative.

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  5. When I look in the mirror I see my father's hairline and the twinkle of his eyes. Boy do I miss that man.

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  6. In the mirror, I see my father's head shape and his nose. I also see his compassion for his family, clients and friends. I see his sense of humor, optimism and even roving eyes.

    I simply loved when my father would call me son. In fact, the very last thing my father said to me just hours before his fatal heart attack was, "Be careful in Africa--I love you son!" Now, I assume one of the first things my father to me when I was born was, "Hello son!" So for me, my relationship with my father is perfectly bookmarked with "son up" and "son down"!

    I love you Dad...and I miss you, from Harris II, your son!

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  7. Very, very touching, Harris. I know your heart inspired your words but you certainly have a gift with words as well.

    I love my daddy, too but I am not that eloquent! He, at 82, still has a twinkle in his eye and a sweet grin.

    Hopefully not just this day, but every day, we can reflect and remember those men who raised (or helped raise us) and rejoice in their special gifts.

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  8. Angela W.June 20, 2010

    When I look in the mirror, I see my fathers large nostrils. LOL. I also see his sense of humor and his ability to meet no strangers.

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  9. Since I didn't know my Dad I have to say that he passed down to me the importance of a father.

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  10. I see 30+ years of running and jogging and working out. My dad was always in good shape ... I guess that would come with being a gym teacher and a coach ... and he started me running when I was 13 or 14. I am very thankful he did! I love you dad!

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  11. Unfortunately, this is not a good question for me. When I look in the mirror "I see a faint resemblance of William "Billy" Hinkle." Lucky for me, my father did not pass any of his habits or charactistics to me. Thank you God. However, what he did do was move out of the way so a more suitable, wonderful man could raise me and mole me into the person I am today. I guess I could say Billy showed me that it does not have to be your natural dad to have a real Father in your life. My appreciation and love is for Russell E. Anderson.

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  12. When I look in the mirror, I see my daddy's face...I look alot like him.

    My parents had married and divorced EACH OTHER TWICE by the time I was 7 years old. They had been married 14 years when I was born. They divorced when I was 3 or 4. Remarried when I was 6, divorced again when I was 7.

    I have no recollection of living with my father until 2001 when he came to live with me and my family at age 74. My dad was a lot of fun. He was intensely social and multi-talented. He taught high school English, Debate and Music in his young years. We are native Alabamians and one of my favorite Daddy stories is how he was arrested when I was just a few days old during the Civil Rights Movement in 1963. The story goes that my dad saw one of his students being harrassed by a police officer in downtown "Bomb"ingham. When my father tried to assist the young man, he was arrested and detained.

    After my folks final divorce, my father moved to a neighboring city about 35 miles outside of Birmingham. My sister and I would get to spend Saturday with him once every few months. I lived for those days. I loved my daddy and knew that he loved me. But his physical absence in my life profoundly impacted me. A friend once described herself as a "Daddy's little girl without a daddy." I totally get that sentiment. This past Father's Day I realized that I still have some processing (grieving) to do over his loss in my (young) life...

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  13. When I look in the mirror I see my father's
    snow white hair on top of his dark skin... he
    is A BLACK AMERICAN.

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  14. AnonymousJuly 05, 2010

    I see my dad´s eyes, and his sisters beautiful faces. He is the youngest of 10, Canadian, living in Virgina, still in love with my mom and pretty confused about a lot of little stupid stuff,due to the craziness of aging, but still the smartest man I know.
    HMK

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  15. When I look in the mirror I see my father's nose and skin tags. A crazy hereditary thing.

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  16. When I look in the mirror I see my father's nose and skin tags. A crazy hereditary thing.

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  17. I see 30+ years of running and jogging and working out. My dad was always in good shape ... I guess that would come with being a gym teacher and a coach ... and he started me running when I was 13 or 14. I am very thankful he did! I love you dad!

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So, what's your take on this? Oh c'mon, share a little!