August 28, 2010

"Tongue Tied..."

What word or words do you routinely just mispronounce?


Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious

27 comments:

  1. I was in a meeting last week and tried to say "Analytic" and all that came out was "Annie Lennox"...go figure. I routinely have trouble with these words too:

    - "Nicaragua" comes out like Nicagarga
    - "Alzheimer" is bungled into Olds Timer
    - "Jacqueline" just won't come out right
    - "Susceptible" sounds like Clare Huxtable...

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  2. Michael K.August 28, 2010

    Police Ociffer, I mean Officer.

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  3. salmon,elementary.

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  4. J. RandorfAugust 28, 2010

    I assume this is just English. There are many words I learned from reading but never actually heard out loud until I was older. I had my own pronunciation for them. Most of them were astronomical, Betelgeuse was one. For some reason I would pronounce this in my mind as "Ben-Glenn-knees" even though there was no "n". The rest are Korean words outside the scope of this comment.

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  5. You're crazy Boswick. LOL.

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  6. J.J. of Bay AreaAugust 28, 2010

    Vulnerable - I always leave the "L" out and it sounds like venerable. And kvadrat, but that's Swedish - can't get the k & the v together in the same sound.

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  7. Well, if we are going to other languages, then just let me say that I have the hardest time pronouncing French words with "uil", such as: Cuillère (spoon), Feuille (leaf) or Fauteuil (arm chair). They just will not roll off my tongue but get caught up in the back of my throat somewhere....damn!

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  8. Well I thought and I thought but could not think of words that I consistently mispronounce. However, I can list a couple that I consistently hear mispronounced like kinnygarden (kindergarten) and ambulance along with samich (sandwich), scrimp (shrimp).

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  9. E. ChamberlainAugust 29, 2010

    Like all native Mainers, I can't correctly pronounce any word that ends with the letter R. "Drawer" always comes out "draw."

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  10. DollBaby MathisAugust 29, 2010

    Just because I can't think of any English words right now doesn't mean there aren't any. But the French words rejoindre and entretien stomp me every time.

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  11. Is it: 'wadder', 'warter', 'warder', 'wadduh',
    'wahter' or 'whar' (as in "gimme drank a whar, ahm thuddy"?

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  12. Because I heard a two-year say this word wrong, I have a hard time saying it right - disappear. Instead I pronouce like that cute litte girl - disc-ca-peer.

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  13. I never mispronounce words in English...I do a whole lot of things that are not perfectly accomplished--but words are my perfume, my elixir, my obsession. However, it makes me go positively, well, nuclear when "nuclear" is mangled...or "bouquet" or "detritus"....the list could go on...and let's not even talk about odious misspellings...well, that's a whole 'nother column in and of itself! :)

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  14. D. RoycroftAugust 29, 2010

    Can't think of any, but can't stop using a few ungrammatical colloquialisms I grew up with; e.g., "So aren't I." At least I've stopped putting an "R" between a word that ends with a vowel and a word that begins with one; i.e., I no longer say vanilla-rice cream.

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  15. @ Betty: I must disagree with you...Sanmich is indeed a word...well, at least in my family...take note:


    “The Importance of Being Sanmich”

    My sister once defined a sandwich as anything contained between two slices of bread. She quickly added that a Sanmich is anything between two slices of bread that extends, falls out of or otherwise oozes here and there. Watercress and mayo on Melba toast is indeed a sandwich. However, four scoops of homemade chunky chicken salad piled high and wide between two slices of whatever bread is indubitably a Sanmich. Mom’s homemade hamburgers on Wonder Bread® was a Sanmich—especially seeing the red and yellow of the ketchup and mustard showing through the top of the bread.

    Fried fish with head and tail intact poking out on both sides of the bread is a Sanmich. A short rib Sanmich dunked in BBQ sauce is undoubtedly a Sanmich. A sloppy-Joe by its sheer nature should be a Sanmich. If it isn’t, then it ain’t no sloppy-Joe.

    Of course, Sanmiches can be made with the end pieces of a loaf of bread. A two-end piece Sanmich will help keep the liquid from seeping through. With a sandwich, the bread is an important piece…surely it adds to the integrity and character of the culinary production. However, with a Sanmich, the bread is only there as a futile attempt to hold whatever is inside in, keep your clothes—that blouse you sneaked from your sister-in-laws closet—clean.

    In a Sanmich, the bread serves as a:
    - Napkin
    - Conduit
    - Grease absorber
    - Sopper-upper
    - Barrier between hands, clothes, shoes, table, Persian rug and the stuff inside

    So, if you are still not sure of the difference between a mere Sandwich and a Sanmich, please take this test:

    - If you pick it up, bite into it and nothing falls out, then it’s a Sandwich.

    - If you use one or both end pieces of the loaf of bread, it’s a Sanmich.

    - If what’s inside soaks through the bread, it’s a Sanmich.

    - If there’s watercress or bean sprouts involved in any way no matter how overstuffed or tumbling-out it may be, it’s a Sandwich.

    - If there are no condiments, sauces, dressings or added wetness of any kind, it’s a Sandwich, dry as heck, but just a Sandwich.

    - If it’s a Sloppy Joe and half of its contents aren’t on your plate, napkin or in your lap, then, first of all, it’s not a Sloppy Joe; and secondly, it’s just a Sandwich.

    - If Mom won’t let you eat it, trust me, it’s a Sanmich.

    - It it’s sold in a parking lot in conjunction with a charity car wash, it’s a Sanmich.

    - If you eat it in total secrecy and then lie through your mustard stained teeth when confronted, then, you guessed it, it’s a Sanmich.

    - Now, don’t be so quick… Simply using something other than bread doesn’t automatically make it a Sanmich. Substituting bread with, let’s say, crackers, or cucumbers, then, volia, une nouvelle sandwiche—still a Sandwich no doubt.

    - However, two 2 ½ x 2 ½ saltine crackers with a 4 x 4 chuck of cheese is, you got it, a Sanmich.

    - If it is Attorney Bostic’s infamous assemblage of two squarely puzzled-fit fried chicken wings, tomato slices, mayonnaise, Worcestershire sauce, salt & pepper all nestled between two pieces of wheat bread, need I say, it’s a Sanmich or more appropriated labeled: a Dammich (damn Sanmich).

    - If when asked “what do you want on your hamburger” you reply, “a hotdog,” then you are one Sanmich-eating-son-of-a-something!

    - If it has anything to do with a pork chop between bread, it’s a Sanmich.

    - Speaking of pork chops, if the meat inside still has its bones intact, it’s a Sanmich.

    - If it has anything between two pieces of cornbread, it’s a Sanmich.

    - Anything to do with “Warm and Serve” rolls, it’s a Sanmich.

    “Sandwich vs. Sanmich: The People Rest”

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  16. I am ROFLMBO!!!! I don't immediately think of any that give me trouble but my mom (a degree holding high school teacher) used to say incenAtive (for incentive). Used to drive me bonkers!

    I know there are a few that get me but I just can't bring them to mind at the moment.

    In the words of Arnold... "I'll be back..." :D

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  17. You want to get tongue tied, try this :

    "Be Brief and to the Point"

    In promulgating your esoteric cogitations, or articulating your superficial sentimentalities and amicable, philosophical or psychological observations, beware of platitudinous pon...derosity. Let your conversational comprehensibleness be a coalescent consistency and a concatenated cogency. Eschew all conglomerations of flatulent garrulity, jejune babblement and asinine affections. Let your extemporaneous descantings and unpremeditated expatiation have intelligibility and veracious vivacity, without rodomontade or ultrasonical bombast. Sedulously avoid all polysyllabic profundity, pompous perplexity, ventriloquial verbosity and ventrose vapidity. Shun double-entendres, prurient jocosity and pestiferous profanity, obscurant or apparent.

    In essence: be brief, and to the point.

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  18. It's past midnight after a long day but this has been a great way to get ready for bed! A great read, especially the 'sammies'

    I keep saying it: Harris, you have a GIFT!

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  19. Is it : Ad VER TEYES MENT (ADVERTISEMENT) OR

    AD VERT IZ MENT?

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  20. When I am tried I mispronounce so many words... I do not know where to begin... mmm amicable,

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  21. @Wendell - I noticed a few Palinic foibles.

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  22. I don´t think it´s ever really a problem to say Annie Lenox, mispronuncing Alzeheimer´s is a freebie, especially if you can actually spell it...Jackie, just say Jackie.
    You can thank Bill Cosby for the last one.

    See, it always works out just fine!

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  23. Best misquote from our house, was from our youngest, when we lived in Tennessee...and when asked where he was from he always responded....Nashpittle, Nashpittle, Tennessee

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  24. It's past midnight after a long day but this has been a great way to get ready for bed! A great read, especially the 'sammies'

    I keep saying it: Harris, you have a GIFT!

    ReplyDelete
  25. I never mispronounce words in English...I do a whole lot of things that are not perfectly accomplished--but words are my perfume, my elixir, my obsession. However, it makes me go positively, well, nuclear when "nuclear" is mangled...or "bouquet" or "detritus"....the list could go on...and let's not even talk about odious misspellings...well, that's a whole 'nother column in and of itself! :)

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  26. DollBaby MathisDecember 30, 2010

    Just because I can't think of any English words right now doesn't mean there aren't any. But the French words rejoindre and entretien stomp me every time.

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  27. J.J. of Bay AreaDecember 30, 2010

    Vulnerable - I always leave the "L" out and it sounds like venerable. And kvadrat, but that's Swedish - can't get the k & the v together in the same sound.

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So, what's your take on this? Oh c'mon, share a little!