November 06, 2010

Take This Job And LOVE It!

What's the toughest job you ever loved?

10 comments:

  1. My current one! Working with teens in an underfunded public school district---whew!

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  2. My 5+ years working for the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games were an exercise in strategizing, policy-making, risk-taking, nail biting, negotiating, diplomacy, problem solving and multi-tasking all at warp speeds—I wouldn’t change a thing if I could...it was great!!!

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  3. Although I thought is would have been said a few times over, Motherhood. It so hard, yet it's so rewarding.

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  4. For the past ten years I have been working as a hospice caregiver. Every day that I get to spend with my clients is a good one and I'm grateful for the opportunity to provide a safe haven for them, their family and friends.

    Henry

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  5. Working for Peace Corps, strangely enough. I ran my butt off scurrying around the country on terrible roads meeting volunteers and dealing with an amazing variety of problems from personal quirks to security and health worries. Nobody died though a couple came close (including a car wreck that I believe included Harris?). At the end of my time in Guinea, I really felt like I'd made a difference both for the country and the volunteers I was working with

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  6. Being a Realtor has to be the toughest job I ever loved. When o entered this career, things were okay. But the market has really taken a turn downward and made life very difficult. I remain because there is nothing more satisfying than watching a buyer get their home or seeing the relief on a seller's face when they finally close. I will hang in here.

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  7. With only one exception, I've loved every job I ever had. Perhaps the one that was most difficult and most rewarding was being the manager of a branch library in rural Texas. I'd never managed anyone before. And the little staff (3 women) were all about my mother's age. Though the little town was racially mixed, there were only old white women visiting the library. I worked there 6 years; I'm still in touch with the staff. And by the time I left, the library customers looked just like the town--in age, sex, race, and culture. Something interesting every day.

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  8. The Peace Corps. For HB2, no I was not a volunteer. I was a staff memeber which is just as important and rewarding. The department I worked in VRS (Volunteer, Recruitment and Selection) was to me the most important department. We had to recruit the volunteers, prepare them for the country and send them off.

    I love the experience I gain from the Peace Corps, the friends I have met and still have (HB2:-)and the FUN.

    For the first three years, I never took a day off. I never wanted to miss work. That should tell you something about the place.

    I also love what I do now at the National Cancer Institute--managing research laboratories. How can you not love a place that is working so hard (outside of the politics)to end CANCER.

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  9. Working for Peace Corps, strangely enough. I ran my butt off scurrying around the country on terrible roads meeting volunteers and dealing with an amazing variety of problems from personal quirks to security and health worries. Nobody died though a couple came close (including a car wreck that I believe included Harris?). At the end of my time in Guinea, I really felt like I'd made a difference both for the country and the volunteers I was working with

    ReplyDelete
  10. My 5+ years working for the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games were an exercise in strategizing, policy-making, risk-taking, nail biting, negotiating, diplomacy, problem solving and multi-tasking all at warp speeds—I wouldn’t change a thing if I could...it was great!!!

    ReplyDelete

So, what's your take on this? Oh c'mon, share a little!